FANDOM


Accelerometer
220px-Accelerometer


0 Months / 0 Minutes
0 Months / 0 Minutes
0 Months / 0 Minutes
0 Months / 0 Minutes
0 Months / 60 Minutes
No Significant


{{{Life Safety}}}
{{{Critical Alarm}}}

About

An accelerometer is a electromechanical device that measures proper acceleration. This is not necessarily the same as the coordinate acceleration (change of velocity of the device in space), but is rather the type of acceleration associated with the phenomenon of weight experienced by a test mass that resides in the frame of reference of the accelerometer device. For an example of where these types of acceleration differ, an accelerometer will measure a value when sitting on the ground, because masses there have weights, even though they do not change velocity. However, an accelerometer in gravitational free fall toward the center of the Earth will measure a value of zero because, even though its speed is increasing, it is in an inertial frame of reference, in which it is weightless.

An accelerometer thus measures weight per unit of (test) mass, a quantity also known as specific force, or g-force. Another way of stating this is that by measuring weight, an accelerometer measures the acceleration of the free-fall reference frame (inertial reference frame) relative to itself.

Most accelerometers do not display the value they measure, but supply it to other devices. Real accelerometers also have practical limitations in how quickly they respond to changes in acceleration, and cannot respond to changes above a certain frequency of change.

Single- and multi-axis models of accelerometer are available to detect magnitude and direction of the proper acceleration (or g-force), as a vector quantity, and can be used to sense orientation (because direction of weight changes), coordinate acceleration (so long as it produces g-force or a change in g-force), vibration, shock, and falling (a case where the proper acceleration changes, since it tends toward zero). Micromachined accelerometers are increasingly present in portable electronic devices and video game controllers, to detect the position of the device or provide for game input.

Pairs of accelerometers extended over a region of space can be used to detect differences (gradients) in the proper accelerations of frames of references associated with those points. These devices are called gradiometers, as they measure gradients in the gravitational field. Such pairs of accelerometers in theory may also be able to detect gravity waves.

Medical applications

Zoll's AED Plus uses CPR-D•padz which contain an accelerometer to measure the depth of CPR chest compressions.

Within the last several years, Nike, Polar and other companies have produced and marketed sports watches for runners that include footpods, containing accelerometers to help determine the speed and distance for the runner wearing the unit.

In Belgium, accelerometer-based step counters are promoted by the government to encourage people to walk a few thousand steps each day.

Herman Digital Trainer uses accelerometers to measure strike force in physical training.[1][2]

References

  1. The Contender 3 Episode 1 SPARQ testing ESPN
  2. Welcome to GoHerman.com innovator of interactive personal training for fitness, - MARTIAL ARTS & MMA


Links


See also

Video

How-to Tuesday Arduino 101 Accelerometers07:41

How-to Tuesday Arduino 101 Accelerometers

How-to Tuesday: Arduino 101 Accelerometers

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.